Christopher B. Leinberger

Christopher B. Leinberger

Christopher Leinberger is a land use strategist, developer, teacher, consultant and author helping to make progressive development profitable. He is currently a Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC, focusing on research and practices to help transform traditional and suburban downtowns to places that provide "walkable urbanism." 
 
Leinberger is also a professor and director of the Graduate Real Estate Program at the University of Michigan. In addition, he is a founding partner of Arcadia Land Company, a progressive real estate development firm. He was co-chair of the New Mexico Governor Richardson's Task Force on Our Communities and Our Future and served on the Planned Growth Strategy Implementation Task Force and the Impact Fee Task Force in Albuquerque. He also serves on the advisory boards of The Conservation Fund and the Enterprise Foundation.
 
Leinberger has written award-winning articles for publications such as the Atlantic Monthly, the Wall Street Journal, and Urban Land magazine. He has been profiled by CNN, "The Today Show," and National Public Radio.
 
He lives the Dupont Circle area of Washington, DC with his wife, Lisa.
Washburn

Now Coveted: A Walkable, Convenient Place

Walking isn't just good for you. It has become an indicator of your socioeconomic status. Until the 1990s, exclusive suburban homes that were accessible only by car cost more, per square foot, than other kinds of American housing. Now, however,...
Walking isn't just good for you. It has become an indicator of your socioeconomic status. Until the 1990s, exclusive suburban homes that were accessible only by car cost more, per square foot, than other kinds of American housing. Now, however, these suburbs have become overbuilt, and housing values have fallen. Today, the most valuable real estate lies in walkable urban locations. Many of these now pricey places were slums just 30 years ago. Mariela Alfonzo and I just released a Brookings Institution study that measures values of commercial and residential real estate in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, which includes the surrounding suburbs in Virginia and Maryland. Our research shows that real estate values increase as neighborhoods became more walkable, where everyday needs, including working, can be met by walking, transit or biking. There is a five-step “ladder” of walkability, from least to most walkable. On average, each step up the walkability ladder adds $9 per square foot to annual office rents, $7 per square foot to retail rents, more than $300 per month to apartment rents and nearly $82 per square foot to home values. Read the rest via the NY Times.