Emily Monosson

Emily Monosson

Emily Monosson is a toxicologist and author, a member of the Ronin Institute for Independent Scholarship, and holds an adjunct faculty position in the Department of Environmental Conservation at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. In recent years, her focus has turned toward the impact of industrial age chemicals and technology on food and medicine. Her most recent books are Natural Defense: Enlisting Bugs and Germs to Save Our Food and Medicine, Unnatural Selection: How We Are Changing Life Gene by Gene, and Evolution in a Toxic World: How Life Responds to Chemical Threats. She has published in The Scientist, Aeon, LA Times, American Scientist, and Whole Terrain in addition to academic journals and blogs somewhat regularly at toxicevolution.wordpress.com.

Natural Defense by Emily Monosson | An Island Press book

Natural Defense: Enlisting Bugs and Germs to Protect Our Food and Health

Wednesday, October 4, 2017 - 7:00pm EDT
Arnold Arborteum
Hunnewell Building
125 Arborway
Boston, MA 02130
United States
Natural Defense: Enlisting Bugs and Germs to Protect Our Food and Health

Emily Monosson, PhD, Environmental Toxicologist, Writer, and Adjunct Professor, Department...

Natural Defense: Enlisting Bugs and Germs to Protect Our Food and Health

Emily Monosson, PhD, Environmental Toxicologist, Writer, and Adjunct Professor, Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

1 Session: Wednesday, October 4, 7:00–8:15pm

Location: Hunnewell Building

For more than a century, we have relied on chemical cures to keep our bodies free from disease and our farms free from bugs and weeds. We rarely consider human and agricultural health together, but both are based on the same ecology, and both are being threatened by organisms that have evolved to resist our antibiotics and pesticides. Fortunately, scientists are finding new solutions that work with, rather than against, nature. Emily Monosson will speak about some of science’s most innovative strategies and the growing understanding of how to employ ecology for our own protection. Natural Defense, Monosson’s newest book, will be available for purchase and signing.
 

Fee Free member and student, $5 nonmember

Emily Monosson at Everyone's Books

Friday, July 28, 2017 - 6:00pm EDT
Everyone's Books
25 Elliot St
Brattleboro, VT 05301
United States

Emily Monosson is a toxicologist focusing on the impact of industrial age chemicals on our food and medicine. This new book explores human and agricultural health together and the innovative methods scientists...

Emily Monosson is a toxicologist focusing on the impact of industrial age chemicals on our food and medicine. This new book explores human and agricultural health together and the innovative methods scientists are creating to work with nature, rather than against it.

This is going to be a fascinating discussion and we do hope you'll join us for it!

WWF Fuller Seminar with Emily Monosson

Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 4:30pm EDT
World Wildlife Fund
1250 24th St. NW
Washington, DC 20037
United States
NATURAL DEFENSE: ENLISTING BUGS AND GERMS TO SAVE OUR FOOD AND MEDICINE

When: June 22, 2017 at 4:30 pm Who: Emily Monosson Where: WWF’s Washington, D.C. Headquarters (1250 24th St. NW, Washington, DC 20037)

About the seminar:...

NATURAL DEFENSE: ENLISTING BUGS AND GERMS TO SAVE OUR FOOD AND MEDICINE

When: June 22, 2017 at 4:30 pm
Who: Emily Monosson
Where: WWF’s Washington, D.C. Headquarters (1250 24th St. NW, Washington, DC 20037)

About the seminar:

Bugs and germs are big problems—but in the fight to protect our food and health, they may also be part of the solution. In this talk, toxicologist and veteran science writer Emily Monosson will discuss the ideas from her exciting new book Natural Defense: Enlisting Bugs and Germs to Protect Our Food and HealthMonosson will present examples of natural defenses for both food and health, revealing parallels between medicine and agriculture and the importance of considering both together. Examples will include innovations that bring together ecology and the latest advancements in technology. From machine learning for diagnosing plant disease, to pheromones that distract crop-destroying moths from mating, to bacteria busting viruses that can preserve food and cure antibiotic resistant infections, these emerging solutions give hope for a healthier and more sustainable future.

WWF’s Science for Nature Seminars provide a regular forum for the conservation community to learn, discuss, network and inspire. The series seeks to advance the discussion of cutting edge research relating to international conservation by featuring distinguished scientists from across the globe. Seminars are:

  • Free
  • Open to the public
  • Held at WWF’s Washington, D.C. Headquarters (1250 24th St. NW, Washington, DC 20037)
  • Begin at 4:30 p.m., followed by a reception at 5:30 p.m.