Lance Hosey

Lance Hosey, a nationally recognized architect, designer, and author, is Chief Sustainability Officer with the global design leader RTKL. He is a former Director with William McDonough + Partners and co-author, with Kira Gould, of Women in Green: Voices of Sustainable Design (2007).

#ForewordFriday: Green Design Edition

In honor of St. Patrick's Day, Island Press wanted to share an excerpt with a little green in it. In The Shape of Green, nationally recognized architect and designer...

In honor of St. Patrick's Day, Island Press wanted to share an excerpt with a little green in it. In The Shape of Green, nationally recognized architect and designer Lance Hosey offers an answer to the question: does going green change the face of design or only its content? The first book to outline principles for the aesthetics of sustainable design, The Shape of Green argues that beauty is inherent to sustainability, and that how things look and feel is as important as how they're made. In addition to examining what makes something attractive, Hosey connects these questions with practical design challenges. Drawing from a wealth of scientific research, Hosey demonstrates that form and image can enhance conservation, comfort, and community at every scale of design, from products to buildings to cities.

Check out an excerpt from the book below.

 
Washburn

A Better Standard of Better Design

Design, declared Nobel economist Herbert Simon, means "changing existing situations into better ones." Wonderful, but who decides what's "better"?
Lance HoseyDesign, declared Nobel economist Herbert Simon, means "changing existing situations into better ones." Wonderful, but who decides what's "better"? With architecture, often what passes for good is whatever the designer says it is. From The Fountainhead's Howard Roark ("The creator serves nothing and no one. He lives for himself.") to Frank Gehry ("To deny the validity of self-expression is akin to not believing in democracy."), the architect is understood to be the de facto judge of quality. In a recent lecture, famed architect Rem Koolhaas reportedly lamented about losing power, the certainty that "things will be as you want them." A better situation is one in which the architect gets what he wants. In recent years, this ethic has begun to change. The green building movement, by offering an objective set of principles for good performance based on the use of resources and the promotion of healthier habitats, has shifted the measure of good design from what the architect wants to what the world needs -- a better standard of "better." The benefits of this new approach are clear. According to estimates, over the past decade the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system has cut annual carbon emissions by 9.4 million tons -- the equivalent of taking 1.5 million cars off the road. Imagine if everyone in Phoenix stopped driving. Forever. Such numbers show real progress -- tangible value that can be quantified. But there's one problem: Many of these buildings aren't doing as well as expected. In 2008, the New Buildings Institute studied more than 100 LEED-certified buildings to compare intended and actual energy performance, and the results were startling. Together, LEED buildings are saving about 30 percent more energy than the national average, but just as many are doing worse than anticipated as are doing better. Nearly 10 percent of the buildings are performing so poorly that they fail to meet the baseline energy code. More at Huffingtonpost
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The Responsible Business

On May 4, at the Living Futures conference in Portland, I had the great pleasure of hearing a keynote by the uproarious Carol Sanford.
On May 4, at the Living Futures conference in Portland, I had the great pleasure of hearing a keynote by the uproarious Carol Sanford. Her latest book, The Responsible Business: Sustainability & Successvoted one of the best business books of last year, outlines stories of 30 companies that became more socially responsible—without ever declaring their intention to do so. The funny thing about this book on sustainability is that the author hates the term. “I know nothing about sustainability,” says Sanford. “I don’t even know what that is.” Her publisher encouraged use of the word to boost sales, but Sanford was hesitant. “I don’t work for corporate responsibility. I work to make great businesses.” Read more Lance Hosey will chat about his new book, The Shape of Green, tonight, May 15th at 6pm PST at SPUR.