Nathaniel Keohane

Nathaniel O. Keohane

Nathaniel Keohane is a Vice President at Environmental Defense Fund, where he leads EDF’s International Climate program and helps to shape the organization’s advocacy for environmentally effective and economically sound climate policy. Dr. Keohane's areas of expertise include U.S. and international climate and energy policy, the economic impact of climate change, the benefits and costs of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the design and performance of cap-and-trade programs and other policy instruments.
An economist with expertise in energy and environmental policy, Dr. Keohane also holds a position as Adjunct Professor of Law at New York University, where he teaches a seminar on climate change policy.
Previously, Dr. Keohane served in the Obama Administration as Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment in the National Economic Council and Domestic Policy Council, where he helped to develop and coordinate administration policy on a wide range of energy and environmental issues. Before joining the Administration, he directed economic policy and analysis at EDF, playing a lead role in the efforts to enact comprehensive cap-and-trade legislation in Congress.
Prior to EDF, Dr. Keohane was an Associate Professor of Economics at the Yale School of Management. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2001 and his B.A. from Yale College in 1993.

#ForewordFriday: Markets and the Environment Edition

A clear grasp of economics is essential to understanding why environmental problems arise and how we can address them. So it is with good reason that Markets and the...

A clear grasp of economics is essential to understanding why environmental problems arise and how we can address them. So it is with good reason that Markets and the Environment has become a classic text in environmental studies since its first publication in 2007. Now thoroughly revised with updated information on current environmental policy and real-world examples of market-based instruments, the primer is more relevant than ever.

Check out Chapter 5, "Market Failures in the Environmental Realm" below.