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Robert Jonathan Cabin

Robert J. Cabin is Associate Professor of Ecology and Environmental Science at Brevard College. Before returning to academia, he worked as a restoration ecologist for the U.S. Forest Service and the National Tropical Botanical Garden.
Photo credit: Supreme Court Pediment by Flickr.com user Kevin Harber

EPA's Decision Not to Regulate Biomass Carbon Emissions Is Another 'Clean Energy' Smokescreen

Under the guise of what EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson described as "renewable, homegrown power," her agency just gave the green light to yet another destructive, unaccountable industry that unnecessarily threatens our climate, forests and health....
Under the guise of what EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson described as "renewable, homegrown power," her agency just gave the green light to yet another destructive, unaccountable industry that unnecessarily threatens our climate, forests and health. Earlier this month, the EPA announced that it will give biomass-burning facilities a three-year reprieve on new federal greenhouse gas regulations . . . read the rest over at HuffingtonPost
Photo Credit: Birds on a Wire by Flickr.com user Kiwi Flickr

Robert Cabin on The Environmental Consequences of Religious Scientism

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them." --Albert Einstein
We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them." --Albert Einstein In my previous blog I introduced the problem of scientism -- the religious-like belief that science is necessarily the best or only valid approach to learning more about the physical world and solving applied problems. Here I address some of the comments to that blog by discussing the negative consequences of scientism in agriculture and environmental conservation. I conclude by offering a few "nonscientific" alternatives for situations in which a formal scientific methodology may not be the most appropriate and effective approach. Read the rest over at HuffingtonPost.
Photo credit: Supreme Court Pediment by Flickr.com user Kevin Harber

Thank God Environmentalism Is Dead

A recent Gallup poll found "historically low levels of public worry about environmental problems," and more than a third of those...
A recent Gallup poll found "historically low levels of public worry about environmental problems," and more than a third of those polled believe the environmental movement "has done more harm than good." Once upon a time, Americans responded to environmental disasters by passing landmark laws like the Clean Air Act. Now it seems our support for the environment decreases with each new oil spill. What happened? Committment Read the rest of Robert J. Cabin's blog post on Huffington Post