Photo Credit: Birds on a Wire by Flickr.com user Kiwi Flickr

Some Kudos from Scientists Using Island Press Books

"Now we are translating this book into Korean and would like to spread H. Bruce Franklin "Now we are translating this book into Korean and would like to spread H. Bruce Franklin's idea about over-fishing and ecology concerns to people in our area."

"We organized a 'fish book club' about ocean books and chose The Most Important Fish in the Sea, which we learned about through the American nonprofit The Ocean Project. The book helped us understand over-fishing problems, diminishing fisheries resources, and environmental disasters in the global ocean. We recently saw a drop in the pollock population in our area. We don’t have any clear clue what happened, but experts suspect overfishing and climate change could be the main reasons for this phenomenon. Now we are translating this book into Korean and would like to spread [author] H. Bruce Franklin’s ideas about over-fishing and ecology concerns to people in our area. Eventually we want to help sustainable fishery management and keep our marine ecosystem service safe and profitable." —Jason Oh, Research Scientist, National Fisheries Research and Development Institute, Republic of Korea    
This book has really helped inform the work of foresters and biologists world-wide. "This book has really helped inform the work of foresters and biologists world-wide."

"Some years back while we were working together on the Northern Forest Protection Fund project for OSI [Open Space Institute], we were having some challenges explaining the importance of proper management of working forests to a segment of the fund’s conservation-oriented advisory board. This group, and the representative of the major funder, was more focused on the importance of establishing reserves. I was starting to feel a bit frustrated, but then at a key meeting the funder’s representative entered the room, slapped a book on the table and exclaimed, 'Everyone should read this book!' It was Conserving Forest Biodiversity: A Comprehensive, Multiscaled Approach (2002) by David B. Lindenmayer and Jerry F. Franklin. What made this particularly satisfying for me is that I had been eagerly awaiting the publication of the book (I knew that Jerry Franklin was working on it), and I had been more than a little concerned about how I might introduce this book to this group. The problem solved itself. This book has really helped inform the work of foresters and biologists world-wide. There has been an emerging consensus that well-managed working forests can support biodiversity conservation, and that these forests are an essential part of any reserve strategy in forested landscapes." —Mike Ferrucci, Consulting Forester and Forest Certification Auditor