Island Press Field Notes blog

Island Press Field Notes

foreword Friday

By Ann Kinzig / On May 29th, 2017

Honesty and transparency is the best way to preserve the integrity of science—and it’s future.

By Cathleen Kelly / On May 17th, 2017

Rather than pay much more down the road, President Trump should act now to build infrastructure that can withstand the effects of climate change

Photo Credit: Rockaway Youth on Banner by Flickr.com user Light Brigading

By Laurie Mazur / On March 22nd, 2017

An interview with Miya Yoshitani, executive director of the Asian Pacific Environmental Network (APEN)

By Richard Allen Williams, Elena Rios / On March 15th, 2017

Today, more than 100 million Americans depend on healthcare safety-net programs: Medicare, Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act (ACA). But that safety net could be shredded if Dr. Tom Price—Trump’s nominee for Secretary of Health and Human Services—has...

By Amy Vanderwarker / On January 25th, 2017

Low-income communities and communities of color are likely to be hit first and worst by environmental rollbacks under the Trump administration — but they will also be at the forefront of the fight for climate justice.

By Laurie Mazur / On January 18th, 2017

Cities and states can step up their efforts to tackle global warming—with or without federal leadership.

By Linda Rudolph, Kathy Dervin / On November 7th, 2016

Climate change remains the greatest health challenge of this century — but the candidates aren’t talking about it.

By Kyler Geoffroy / On October 20th, 2016

Many of the actions we must take to mitigate climate change-reducing fossil fuel use offer significant benefits for public health. 

By Denise Fairchild / On October 12th, 2016

Understanding the centuries-long abolitionist movement offers insight into the vision, the structural changes, the personal commitments, the political struggles, and the global movement required to stave off catastrophic climate change.

Credit: Kennedy Warne

By Laurie Mazur / On October 4th, 2016

We must snap out of our collective climate denial, and accept that the future will not be like the past. Only then can we protect ourselves from the floods (and the tornadoes, droughts, wildfires, heatwaves, and storm surges) to come—and build a...

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