Island Press Field Notes blog

Island Press Field Notes

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

By Dominick A. DellaSala / On August 16th, 2012

The July 26 editorial "Logging for spotted owls" dismisses decades of scientific research by touting one new study that suggests "heavy thinning" (aka, clear-...

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

By Cristina Eisenberg / On July 10th, 2012

The standing dead trees were everywhere, their boles weathered silver where the bark had peeled. The carcasses of their fallen comrades littered the understory, with few aspen sprouting from the deadfall. The occasional mangled saplings we observed...

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

By Admin / On July 9th, 2012

As I gathered with other concerned Coloradans for the “Forests at Risk” symposium in Aspen, Colorado last week, the importance of climate change and forests became immediately clear with...

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

By Dominick A. DellaSala / On July 5th, 2012

Perhaps no other species symbolizes the conflict over logging in the Pacific Northwest more than the northern spotted owl. This medium-sized, forest-dwelling raptor has been credited with shutting down the logging industry in the 1990s and with...

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

By Dominick A. DellaSala / On May 15th, 2012

British Columbia is endowed with the 7.4 million hectare Great Bear Rainforest and adjacent offshore archipelago of Haida Gwaii, one of the few remaining large blocks of...

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

By Dominick A. DellaSala / On December 14th, 2011

To the untrained eye, New Zealand forests have a tropical feel somewhat out-of-character in a temperate world. Like Australia, these rainforests owe their existence to the ancient ark of Gondwana that broke away from Pangea at a time when dinosaurs were...

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

By Dominick A. DellaSala / On December 9th, 2011

Some 38-45 million years ago, Australia broke off from its parent super-continent, Gondwana, and began drifting northward.  In its long and arduous journey, the ark rafted ancient species forced to cope with a cooling and drying climate. Some, like...

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

By Robert J. Cabin / On April 15th, 2011

The results of last month's annual Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge Bird Survey indicate that birds may colonize reforested areas much faster than experts had predicted. This year's surveyors spotted all five of the common native forest birds and...

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

By Kennedy Warne / On April 14th, 2011

In my travels through the mangroves of the Americas I was keen to learn how mangroves had influenced or been incorporated into local cultures. In Caravelas, in the Brazilian state of Bahia, I met three remarkable brothers who promote the indigenous...

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

By Admin / On April 5th, 2011

No, it's not in Brazil or Borneo. It's actually in the good old USA, literally and figuratively clinging to a steep slope in a drainage called Mahanaloa Gulch on the Hawaiian Island of Kauai. We need to stop twiddling our thumbs and SAVE THIS FOREST NOW.

Pages