Island Press Field Notes blog

Island Press Field Notes

A person writing notes with a pen

By Kyler Geoffroy / On July 26th, 2019

The Island Press Urban Resilience Project is excited to continue the urbanist journalism fellowship this fall with Greater Greater Washington!

Rainbow and Transgender Pride flags

By Natasha Riddle / On July 25th, 2019

In DC, several nonprofits aim to provide housing help that goes beyond simply providing shelter. They are helping young LGBTQ people feel affirmed.

By David F. Coursen / On July 23rd, 2019

Trump’s EPA seeks to limit state’s authority on climate action. If this effort succeeds, our towns and cities will face dirtier air, hotter summers and more extreme weather — and there will be less we can do about it. 

By Chidinma Onuoha / On July 22nd, 2019

Once upon a time, I was sure that I wanted to be an editor. I always liked reading and polishing people’s stories. It felt right to shape up someone's work, to see its beginning and see it transform into a finished product. But, as any recent English...

City street with cars in multiple lanes and one bus.

By Jesse Boudart / On July 17th, 2019

It’s time to break up the automotive monopoly on transportation, and let cleaner, healthier, less expensive technologies take us where we need to go.

On Interning at Island Press

By Simon Boes / On July 15th, 2019

My internship was a genuine peek into the meticulous field of publishing. I always had proper guidance and was never afraid to ask questions, which makes the office such a great place for learning.

Solar panels on a city rooftop

By Natasha Riddle / On July 12th, 2019

In the heart of Columbia Heights, a new apartment building offers residents and nearby community members an unexpected service: Resilience.

Microscopes

By Bernard D. Goldstein / On July 5th, 2019

EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler continues to ignore the value of accurate scientific advice.

Image of the Anacostia River by ThienVinh Nguyen

By ThienVinh Nguyen / On July 3rd, 2019

Tensions around a DC bridge reveal the historical and contemporary realities of how marginalized communities continue to be limited the full breadth of services afforded to other communities, both on land and in the water.

A car drives through a flooded street

By Harriet Festing / On July 2nd, 2019

While rivers will continue to overflow their banks in the era of climate change and record-breaking storms, we can limit the damage and suffering that result.

Pages