A new advocacy campaign aims to ensure that every American can live within a 10-minute walk of a high-quality park or green space

From a city strangled by fossil fuels, a call to fight for a more equitable future emerges. 

A podcast interview with WE ACT For Environmental Justice co-founder Peggy Shepard on the past, present, and future of the environmental justice movement

Communities of color are leading the People’s Climate March all over the country. Why? Because climate change starts in frontline neighborhoods

Photo Credit: Rockaway Youth on Banner by Flickr.com user Light Brigading

An interview with Miya Yoshitani, executive director of the Asian Pacific Environmental Network (APEN)

Communities of color are strong leaders in the fight against climate change, but only if policies and the process genuinely reflect their voice and vision.

Low-income communities and communities of color are likely to be hit first and worst by environmental rollbacks under the Trump administration — but they will also be at the forefront of the fight for climate justice.

To build resilience to twenty-first century challenges, a transformational water ethic must not only respect the water rights of nature, but also the water rights of people, especially the most vulnerable among us.

When New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) unveiled his ambitious environmental agenda last week, he did not choose City Hall or the green meadows of Central Park as his backdrop. 

In December, world leaders will meet in Paris for the UN Climate Conference (COP21). Some say the fate of our planet depends on the outcome.

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