Before we can create vibrant, sustainable urban areas, we need to understand what naturally happens when people congregate in cities.

Almost everything around us was designed by someone; our homes, schools, workplaces, and nearly every imaginable public space. Design is everywhere and, for better or for worse, it shapes the quality of our lives. 

In recent years, some urban planners have begun to explore ways to unlock Dutch-style multimodality, hoping to utilize the bicycle as a tool to increase public-transit ridership and decrease car dependency. In fact, the case could be made that—with...

The formulas that guided suburban growth for more than 60 years no longer work. How can suburbs adapt to increasingly complex social, economic, fiscal, and environmental demands? What new approaches can help them secure their futures?

In Resilience for All Barbara Brown Wilson looks at community engagement methods that are less conventional, but often more...

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The considerable social, economic, and environmental costs of suburban sprawl have been widely reported, but suburbs hold new potential for the 21st century. As ground zero for some of the most disruptive changes stemming from accelerating wealth...

Cities across the globe have been designed with a primary goal of moving people around quickly—and the costs are becoming ever more apparent. The consequences are measured in smoggy air basins, sprawling suburbs, a failure to stem traffic congestion,...

From the CNU Climate Summit, a movement marrying a vision of livable communities to the necessities of a changing climate emerges.

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