default blog post image

Bull Creek undercut the bank in many places, causing mature redwood to fall. Photograph courtesy Professor Paul Zinke.

default blog post image

That might sound like a rather dry, technological subject, but it is, obviously, quite important in relation to wood production from forests. It’s also important to be able to calculate tree growth rates so we can estimate how fast forests can absorb...

default blog post image

Brown crowns denote lodgepole pine killed by bark beetles the previous year.

default blog post image

Originally published by Village News, a publication of the community of Cabin John, MD. Wild, undammed rivers make dangerous neighbors. A signboard near the riverbank at one of the National Park entrances...

default blog post image

Elk browsing aspens in Yellowstone National Park. Photo by Cristina Eisenberg.

default blog post image

Rants from the Hill is cross-posted from High Country News

default blog post image

  Travis Beck, author of the new book Principles of Ecological Landscape Design, recently wrote about one of Hurricane Sandy's more positive effects. Here's an...

default blog post image

David Lindenmayer and Jerry F. Franklin, authors of several Island Press titles, have just collaborated on an important new study. Published in the latest edition of Science, the study reveals...

default blog post image

The standing dead trees were everywhere, their boles weathered silver where the bark had peeled. The carcasses of their fallen comrades littered the understory, with few aspen sprouting from the deadfall. The occasional mangled saplings we observed...

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - trees