Author's Forum—Arbitrary Lines

Author's Forum—Arbitrary Lines

Author Nolan Gray discussed his new book, Arbitrary Lines: How Zoning Broke the American City and How to Fix It. Urban designer and code expert Mary Madden was the interviewer.

This webinar is available for 1 CNU-A continuing education credit.

Arbitrary Lines: Nolan Gray's Conversation with Planetizen

Arbitrary Lines: Nolan Gray's Conversation with Planetizen

City planner M. Nolan Gray and Planetizen's editorial director James Brasuell had a conversation about zoning abolition. Gray argued that this is a necessary—if not sufficient—condition for building more affordable, vibrant, equitable, and sustainable cities. His new book is, Arbitrary Lines: How Zoning Broke the American City and How to Fix It

Build Beyond Zero: New Ideas for Carbon-Smart Architecture

Build Beyond Zero: New Ideas for Carbon-Smart Architecture

“Net Zero” has been a goal of the green building movement, to have every building generate at least as much energy as it uses.  Enormous progress has been made in recent years to improve the performance of new buildings, and in renovating existing buildings to improve their energy performance. 

Healing from Trauma by Building for Health

Healing from Trauma by Building for Health

As cities build and grow, they have a choice to make: to become healers from or creators of trauma.

Trauma in our built environment derives from systemic racism, disinvestment, and disenfranchisement of individuals in our cities. Climate change has the potential to greatly exacerbate these traumas. By investing in people and places, while also changing decision-making processes that have contributed to urban trauma, cities can lead the charge in promoting better health for their citizens and for the planet. Climate mitigation and adaptation could heal those wounds.

Healing Grounds: A Conversation with Author Liz Carlisle

Healing Grounds: A Conversation with Author Liz Carlisle

The Non-GMO Project's Speaker Series recently featured Liz Carlisle, author of Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming.

Creating Transportation Equity from the Ground Up

Creating Transportation Equity from the Ground Up

Transportation accounts for the largest share of emissions in the United States. But many U.S. cities benefit by having dense urban footprints. By expanding low- and zero-carbon mobility options, cities can help to build more equitable transportation systems and increase economic mobility.

Right of Way: Addressing the Epidemic of Pedestrian Deaths in America

Right of Way: Addressing the Epidemic of Pedestrian Deaths in America

The number of pedestrian deaths has been rising in recent years. What can communities do to turn this around?

American Urbanist: How William H. Whyte Reshaped Public Life

American Urbanist: How William H. Whyte Reshaped Public Life

William (Holly) Whyte was a pioneer of people-centered urban design who challenged planners to look beyond their desks and drawings: “You have to get out and walk.”

Effective Conservation: Parks, Rewilding, and Local Development

Effective Conservation: Parks, Rewilding, and Local Development

Ignacio Jiménez has managed conservation projects on three continents over 30 years, pioneering an approach to conservation he calls “Full Nature” that seeks to integrate the ecological health of a region with the health of human communities. His book Effective Conservation: Parks, Rewilding, and Local Development further explores a "Full Nature" approach.

Healing Grounds Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming

Healing Grounds Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming

A powerful movement is happening in farming today—farmers are reconnecting with their roots to fight climate change. Indigenous, Black, Latinx, and Asian American farmers are reviving their ancestors’ methods of growing food—techniques long suppressed by the industrial food system. These farmers are restoring native prairies, nurturing beneficial fungi, and enriching soil health. While feeding their communities and revitalizing cultural ties to land, they are steadily stitching ecosystems back together and repairing the natural carbon cycle.

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