Island Press Events

Events

Tactical Urbanism: Taking Short-Term Actions to Generate Long-term Change

Wednesday, May 18, 2022 - 1:00pm EDT

Pop-up parks, plazas, and full street redesigns have become powerful, adaptable, creative, and low-cost tools to drive lasting improvements in communities the world over.

Whether creating vibrant plazas seemingly overnight or re-imagining streets to better support transit, walking, and cycling, these types of projects, known as “tactical urbanism,” offer a way for communities to gain support for infrastructure investment while inspiring residents and civic leaders to experience and shape their urban spaces in a new way.

Join the Maryland Department of Planning and the Smart Growth Network at 1:00 p.m. EDT, Wednesday, May 18, as Mike Lydon and Anthony Garcia, authors of Tactical Urbanism: Short-term Action for Long-term Change, share the key findings from their book and what has changed since it was released.

Participants of the live webinar are eligible for 1.5 AICP CM credits (live attendance required).

No Farms, No Food by Don Stuart | An Island Press book

No Farms, No Food: Uniting Farmers and Environmentalists to Transform American Agriculture

Wednesday, May 18, 2022 - 12:00pm MST

America’s farms are key to the preservation of vital ecosystems and a stable climate.

Yet farmers and environmentalists have not always seen eye-to-eye about the best ways to manage agricultural landscapes.

Join Don Stuart as he discusses his new book No Farms, No Food, which traces the development of the American Farmland Trust (AFT) responsible for landmark achievements in farmland preservation and conservation practices.

Moderated by Gina Nichols, Assistant Research Professor, Swette Center for Sustainable Food Systems, Global Institute of Sustainability and Innovation.

This virtual event is held by Island Press. Purchase No Farms, No Food from the locally-owned Changing Hands Bookstore HERE.

Wednesday, May 18, 2022
12:00 - 1:00 p.m. AZ Time

Bet the Farm by Beth Hoffman | An Island Press book

The Land in Transition: Hills and Valleys

Sunday, May 22, 2022 - 3:30pm CDT

White Rock Conservancy
1436 Hwy 141
Coon Rapids, IA 50058
United States

Attend a Q&A with Beth Hoffman, author of Bet the Farm, a memoir published in 2021 that chronicles the transfer of Iowa farmland within a family, and sustainable agriculture lessons from a beginning farmer.

About The Land in Transition: Hills and Valleys -- Sunday, May 22, 1:30-5:00pm 

Join the Des Moines Metro Opera and Whiterock Conservancy in Coon Rapids, IA for an afternoon at the intersection of art & culture and agricultural land transfer. As part of a series of events celebrating the world premiere Opera based on Jane Smiley’s Pulitzer Prizewinning novel A Thousand Acres, we will explore the passing of land through family and the ties that bind us, including a Q&A with farmer and author Beth Hoffman

Healing Grounds by Liz Carlisle | An Island Press book

Liz Carlisle with Latrice Tatsey and Hillel Echo-Hawk

Monday, May 23, 2022 - 6:00pm PDT

The Forum
1119 8th Ave (Entrance off Seneca St.)
Seattle, WA 98101
United States

In-person & livestream Town Hall Seattle event: 

In her new book, Healing Grounds, Liz Carlisle shares the stories of Indigenous, Black, Latinx, and Asian American farmers who are restoring native prairies, nurturing beneficial fungi, and enriching soil health to feed their communities and revitalize cultural ties to the land. One woman learned her tribe’s history to help bring back the buffalo. Another preserved forest that was purchased by her great-great-uncle, who was among the first wave of African Americans to buy land. Others have rejected monoculture to grow corn, beans, and squash the way farmers in Mexico have done for centuries. Through techniques long suppressed by the industrial food system, they steadily stitch ecosystems back together and repair the natural carbon cycle. This is true regenerative agriculture, Carlisle explains – not merely a set of technical tricks for storing CO2 in the ground, but a holistic approach that values diversity in plants and people.

But this kind of regenerative farming doesn’t come easily – our nation’s agricultural history is marked by discrimination and displacement. Restoration, repair, and healing can only come from dismantling the power structures that have blocked many farmers of color from owning land or building wealth. Though the task is immense, it holds great promise and hope: that by coming together to restore farmlands, we can not only heal our planet, we can heal our communities and ourselves.

Liz Carlisle is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies Program at UC Santa Barbara, where she teaches courses on food and farming. Born and raised in Montana, she got hooked on agriculture while working as an aide to organic farmer and U.S. Senator Jon Tester, which led to a decade of research and writing collaborations with farmers in her home state. She has written three books about regenerative farming and agroecology: Lentil Underground (2015), Grain by Grain (2019, with co-author Bob Quinn), and most recently, Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming (2022). Prior to her career as a writer and academic, she spent several years touring rural America as a country singer.

Latrice Tatsey (In-niisk-ka-mah-kii) is an ecologist and advocate for tribally-directed bison restoration who remains active in her family’s cattle ranching operation at Blackfeet Nation in northwest Montana. Her research focuses on organic matter and carbon in soil, and specifically, the benefits to soil from the reintroduction of bison (iin-ni) to their traditional grazing landscapes on the Blackfeet Reservation. Latrice is currently completing her master’s degree in Land Resources and Environmental Sciences at Montana State University and she serves as a research fellow with the Piikani Lodge Health Institute and the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Hillel Echo-Hawk (she/her; Pawnee and Athabaskan) is an Indigenous chef, caterer, and speaker born and raised in the interior of Alaska around the Athabaskan village of Mentasta –– home to the matriarchal chief and subsistence rights activist, Katie John. Watching John and other Indigenous Peoples’ fight for food sovereignty, as well as seeing her mother strive to make healthy, home-cooked meals for her and her six siblings, gave Hillel a unique perspective on diet and wellness. Echo-Hawk is the owner of Birch Basket, her food and work has been featured in James Beard, Bon Appetit, Eater, Huffpost, National Geographic, PBS, Vogue, The Seattle Times, and many, many more.


Presented by Town Hall Seattle and sponsored by PCC Community Markets.

Healing Grounds by Liz Carlisle | An Island Press book

Liz Carlisle at Powell's

Tuesday, May 24, 2022 - 7:00pm PDT

Powell's City of Books
1005 W. Burnside St.
Portland, OR 97209
United States

A powerful movement is happening in farming today — farmers are reconnecting with their roots to fight climate change. For one woman, that's meant learning her tribe's history to help bring back the buffalo. For another, it's meant preserving forest purchased by her great-great-uncle, among the first wave of African Americans to buy land. Others are rejecting monoculture to grow corn, beans, and squash the way farmers in Mexico have done for centuries. Still others are rotating crops for the native cuisines of those who fled the "American wars" in Southeast Asia. In Healing Grounds, Liz Carlisle tells the stories of Indigenous, Black, Latinx, and Asian American farmers who are reviving their ancestors' methods of growing food — techniques long suppressed by the industrial food system. These farmers are restoring native prairies, nurturing beneficial fungi, and enriching soil health. While feeding their communities and revitalizing cultural ties to land, they are steadily stitching ecosystems back together and repairing the natural carbon cycle.

This, Carlisle shows, is the true regenerative agriculture — not merely a set of technical tricks for storing CO2 in the ground, but a holistic approach that values diversity in both plants and people. Cultivating this kind of regenerative farming will require reckoning with our nation's agricultural history — a history marked by discrimination and displacement. And it will ultimately require dismantling power structures that have blocked many farmers of color from owning land or building wealth. The task is great, but so is its promise. By coming together to restore these farmlands, we can not only heal our planet, we can heal our communities and ourselves.

Carlisle will be joined in conversation by Latrice Tatsey (In-niisk-ka-mah-kii), ecologist and advocate for tribally-directed bison restoration.

A Road Running Southward by Dan Chapman | An Island Press book

A Road Running Southward Book Launch with Dan Chapman at Manuel's Tavern

Thursday, June 2, 2022 - 7:00pm EDT

Manuel's Tavern
602 North Highland Avenue, NE
Atlanta, GA 30307
United States

"Dan Chapman’s new book is a celebration of America’s nineteenth-century Southern wilderness, and a wake-up call for the beloved, yet endangered, region today. Chapman guides us through a long-ago dazzling, buzzing, glittering world of forests, meadows, rivers, and marshes—dangerously diminished today by urban sprawl and heedless development, but not yet completely vanished from the earth." - Melissa Fay Greene, award-winning author of Praying for Sheetrock and The Temple Bombing

A Cappella Books welcomes longtime journalist and writer Dan Chapman to Manuel’s Tavern to celebrate the release of his book, A Road Running Southward: Following John Muir's Journey through an Endangered Land.

This event is free and open to the public, and copies of the book will be available for purchase.  

Cities for Life by Jason Corburn | An Island Press book

Healing from Trauma by Building for Health

Tuesday, June 7, 2022 - 1:00pm EDT

As cities build and grow, they have a choice to make: to become healers from or creators of trauma.

Trauma in our built environment derives from systemic racism, disinvestment, and disenfranchisement of individuals in our cities. Climate change has the potential to greatly exacerbate these traumas. By investing in people and places, while also changing decision-making processes that have contributed to urban trauma, cities can lead the charge in promoting better health for their citizens and for the planet. climate mitigation and adaptation could heal those wounds.

During this conversation you’ll hear from public health experts, like Cities for Life author Jason Corburn, explaining the structures in place that lead to cities causing trauma and the possible solutions to healing from it. Expect to gain both theoretical understanding and tangible knowledge about this public health crisis.

PLEASE NOTE: We are giving away copies of Cities for Life to the first 100 attendees. To qualify, please include your full address in the registration form. This is not required.