Sit at the tables where people are deciding where the new school will go, whether to expand the bus stop or if a new business can drop itself into a neighborhood, and the first question that comes to mind is, “Where are all the people of color?”

Communities of color are leading the People’s Climate March all over the country. Why? Because climate change starts in frontline neighborhoods

If your organization/coalition/group views racial and ethnic diversity as an endpoint, and is only ready to add another color to your crayon box, please give deep consideration to your intent and process. 

It’s no secret that the climate movement, despite some recent successes, has its problems. Spoken by mostly white voices, our messages are sometimes out of touch with the priorities of frontline communities: the ethnic minorities and low-income people...

When Superstorm Sandy came ashore in 2012, thousands of New Yorkers were plunged into what seemed like an earlier century. No lights. No heat. No refrigeration. No elevators. On the upper floors of high-rise apartment buildings, the taps went dry and...

Can cities shift their systems and structures to become sustainable? This is the second of two  sneak peeks into the newest State of the World publication, ...

Photo Credit: Rockaway Youth on Banner by Flickr.com user Light Brigading

The Island Press Urban Resilience Project, supported by the Kresge Foundation, is working to promote a holistic understanding of resilience that is grounded in equity and sustainability. Harriet Tregoning

 

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