Island Press Field Notes blog

Island Press Field Notes

Blog | Island Press

By Katharine Sucher / On September 25th, 2018

The vaquita is not hunted. Nor is its habitat disappearing or degraded. Nicknamed “panda of the sea,” this diminutive porpoise is even protected by law. So why is the species on the brink of extinction, with fewer than twenty animals remaining? ...

foreword Friday

By Katharine Sucher / On August 10th, 2018

This week, the environmental community lost an indomitable conservationist: Dr. Alan Rabinowitz. Alan was an incredible champion for big cats who's...

Photo Courtesy of Cheryl Dykstra

By Cheryl Dykstra / On July 12th, 2018

Our first nest of the day is a little farther out from town than most, and on a large lot next to an equestrian training center. To us, the immediate habitat looks more suitable for a red-tailed hawk than a red-shouldered hawk, but we’re not hawks,...

By Katharine Sucher / On June 29th, 2018

As I watched, mesmerized, this mass of crustaceans became a living brick-red raft, writhing on top of the water’s surface. The water became disturbed as thousands of krill flipped their muscular tails and leaped clear of the water, falling back like...

A high-tech taxidermy owl with a detachable head. Photo Courtesy of Cheryl Dykstra

By Cheryl Dykstra / On May 29th, 2018

Field notes by Cheryl Dykstra, co-editor of Urban RaptorsMonday, May 14, 2018Cincinnati, Ohio So happy our grad student Ania is back from Texas, having...

By Cheryl Dykstra / On May 15th, 2018

Today was the first day of this year for banding nestling red-shouldered hawks in our suburban study area in Cincinnati, Ohio. Even after 21 years and more than 2,500 nestling hawks banded, the first day is still fun, full of promise, and excitement.

By Katharine Sucher / On May 8th, 2018

As I watched, mesmerized, this mass of crustaceans became a living brick-red raft, writhing on top of the water’s surface. The water became disturbed as thousands of krill flipped their muscular tails and leaped clear of the water, falling back like...

By John Pastor / On March 22nd, 2018

In fall, about 21 mammal and bird species worldwide, mostly in northern regions, change their coat or plumage colors from brown to white. White provides camouflage against predators as snow covers the landscape in winter. In spring, these same animals...

By Cheryl Heller / On March 14th, 2018

This letter is a response to your request for ideas—for the philanthropic strategy you’re thinking about. You say you like long term, but you’re drawn to “the other end of the spectrum: the right now.” I get that, and have the perfect answer for you, one...

By David Salt, Brian Walker / On March 6th, 2018

Re-engaging nature’s ecosystem engineers In the gloomy pall of the advancing Anthropocene, it’s nice to hear good news now and again on the environmental front. And such is the case with...

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