Island Press Field Notes | An Island Press blog

Island Press Field Notes

By Laurie Mazur / On January 18th, 2017

Cities and states can step up their efforts to tackle global warming—with or without federal leadership.

By Alan Mallach / On December 7th, 2016

Trying to predict how different US cities will be affected by climate change is something like trying to predict the movement of a single molecule in a sea of Brownian motion. Not...

By Shirley Laska / On December 1st, 2016

What will happen when thousands of people overwhelm communities? Climate change is mostly a “slow onset” phenomenon.  It does, however, generate fast-onset disasters/catastrophes as well.  Multiple years of drought slowly debilitate the ecosystem,...

By Linda Rudolph, Kathy Dervin / On November 7th, 2016

Climate change remains the greatest health challenge of this century — but the candidates aren’t talking about it.

By Kyler Geoffroy / On October 20th, 2016

Many of the actions we must take to mitigate climate change-reducing fossil fuel use offer significant benefits for public health. 

By Denise Fairchild / On October 12th, 2016

Understanding the centuries-long abolitionist movement offers insight into the vision, the structural changes, the personal commitments, the political struggles, and the global movement required to stave off catastrophic climate change.

By Emily Monosson / On October 11th, 2016

The access issue touches all of us. From the cancer patient wanting to read up on her disease to the community organizers whose groundwater is tainted with solvents, the seaside city planner wanting the latest climate change models, and the high school...

By Stephanie Meeks / On October 5th, 2016

Summertime brings picnics, baseball games, family vacations, and, increasingly, record-busting temperatures. Each of the 10 hottest years on record has happened since 1998, including the hottest of all, 2014. As a preservation community, we are starting...

Credit: Kennedy Warne

By Laurie Mazur / On October 4th, 2016

We must snap out of our collective climate denial, and accept that the future will not be like the past. Only then can we protect ourselves from the floods (and the tornadoes, droughts, wildfires, heatwaves, and storm surges) to come—and build a...

By Cara Pike / On September 20th, 2016

By focusing on preparedness, we can fully engage Americans — all Americans — in crafting solutions to the greatest challenge of our time.

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